English | Dzongkha Friday, October 20, 2017

Hot and mineral springs in Bhutan known for its therapeutic values

Phub Gyem, Thimphu
Feb 2, 2017

With wide range of medicinal plants and age old healing practices, Bhutan has been referred to as the Land of Medicine.

A comprehensive report guide on hot springs and mineral springs, by Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environment (UWICE) confirms that Bhutan truly remains a safe seat of indigenous healing system.

According to a Researcher from UWICE, Tshering Dorji they have carried out the study to know about its medicinal benefits.

“Moreover, for instance, the benefits of the hot springs such as Koma hot spring, Chhuboog hot spring and Gelegphu hot spring are mentioned and recommended by the health ministry due its health benefits. We have mentioned all of these in our book,” he said.

“We have recorded about 10 hot springs and 26 mineral springs. And we are still in the process of our study to find more about the minerals and the medicinal values.”


Scattered across every corner of the country, hot springs and mineral springs are considered sacred and rich in holistic healing properties.

Majority of Bhutanese visit hot springs and mineral spring medicinal baths with the hope of getting their diseases cured.

“I used to have joint pain. It feels much better when I dip in hot spring or else my muscles feel so weak,” says Kapa one of the visitors at the Gelegphu Hot Spring.

The report also mentions that it has the potential to cure certain diseases.

“I have been visiting the hot spring since 2015 as I have pain in my leg. I felt much better after my visit last year. So I came this year too,” said another visitor at the Gelegphu Hot Spring, Duba.

Of the many, Gasa, Gelegphu and Chhuboog hot springs are most common among locals.

Similarly, there are many mineral springs known for their therapeutic values like Dobji menchu in Paro which is known for curing cancer.

The origin of hot springs and mineral springs in Bhutan dates back to 746 AD during the visit of Guru Rinpoche and advent of Mahayana Buddhism to Bhutan. It is therefore considered blessed and sacred.

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